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Best rose for Florida

GG

Best rose for Florida

by 4 years ago
10

What would be the best David Austin rose varieties  for Tampa Florida area for herbal medicine and herbal cosmetics?

MM
4 years ago
Many of the Austin roses grow very well in Florida and here a few to start with The Lady Gardener, Maid Marion, Wollerton Old Hall, Fighting Temeraire, Princess Alexandra of Kent, Sir John Betjeman and Munstead Wood. Others are The Dark Lady, Molineux, Sophy's Rose, Darcy Bussell, Graham Thomas, Scepter'd Isle, Sharifa Asma, Pat Austin. We do have a licensee who grows our roses for us and is organic too - Angel gardens http://www.angelgardens.com/ecommerce/roses-by-hybridizer/austin.html The owner is called Pam and she knows the Austin roses very well, it might well be best to discuss your requirements with her. I guess you'd want ones that are more fragrant and you will see that some of the above like Munstead wood and The Lady Gardener are strongly fragrant while others have little or no fragrance I hope this helps
AK
4 years ago
I've ordered quite a few David Austin roses recently. Any change in planting techniques with the huge amounts of rain, heat and humidity we get in the summer. I'm also right near Tampa
MM
4 years ago
Hello Andrew, very good to hear that you've ordered some Austins recently. The most important thing is to choose the right varieties. Some do brilliantly in your climate others not so well - if you send me what you've chosen I'll be happy to check them. Some people grow them on Fortuniana rootsock and reckon that is the best for that climate but in fact when budded on Dr Huey they still do very well. Those that aren't affected by rain is important although in practice I think the best flowers will be during the winter months and into spring. Disease resistance is also crucial with your rain and humidity. I think your soils tend to be well drained - is that right? if so then drainage shouldn't be an issue. but if not then you might have to try to improve drainage in the soil and/or be sure not to plant deeply and in fact planting a bit on the high side would be good although I hate seeing the big single stem of the rootstock sticking out of the ground. there is a tradition in hotter areas of the states that you should plant high although I'm not convinced how important that is.
AK
4 years ago
I've bought, Abraham Darby, Graham Thomas, Lady of Shallot, and Heritage. The soil here is sand. I make a mix of shrub potting soil, sand manure/compost to try to help enrich it. I'm in Sarasota and live right near the Ringling museum which has the Mable rose garden. Most of what I've picked I have seen in their garden. I have noticed the have their roses planted on a mound, which I'm guessing is for drainage. I had a Pierre de Ronsard die of root rot and I think after I had planted it the soil settled and created a bowl to hold water. My goal was to create an English style garden in Florida (since my house is older) and Austin roses really complete that feel. It is leading to an addiction!
MM
4 years ago
Yes that sounds like a good plan to put them on top of a mound, I think they suffered from bad drainage at the Ringling garden. I've certainly sent roses on Dr Huey there and I think they've done very well. Those varieties should do very well with you and be great to help you create an English style garden.
AK
4 years ago
Don't mind my beginner expertise, but what is Dr Huey? I really appreciate your help, it's like asking for help with your golf swing and Arnold Palmer gives you pointers! This website is amazing.
EB
4 years ago
Sshh. Don't tell everyone, Arnold likes to pop up and surprise and delight our users! Thanks for your questions and comments - great to have you on board.
MM
4 years ago
Dr Huey is a rootstock - most roses are budded onto a different root system to make them grow more strongly and create a saleable plant in a relatively short time. Dr Huey if grown on is a vigorous red climber. Roses can also be budded onto Fortuniana which is vigorous rambler with white flowers and often used in Florida for sandy soils although those on Dr Huey still grow very well. You can also grow them on their own roots ie from cuttings and in fact Angel nurseries in FL do that and grow quite a few Austins. The owner, Pam, would be a very good source of advice on which to grow and cultural advice too.
AP
4 years ago
I am also looking for advice on growing in Sarasota and just was speaking to the garden curator at Ringling on Tuesday. They do have a whole bed of Austins right now. I had success with Fortuniana root stock in Fort Myers and moved here this summer. I'm wanting to rip out a huge bed in front of our house that is full off a bunch of asparagus fern, ficus, and saw palmettos, replant it with roses. I'm looking at the Austin site for roses for this zone that have high disease resistance and strong fragrance. Everything is bare root. I'm assuming this is not on Huey rootstock; am I correct? If I plant now (feb-March) is it too warm to start bare root plants?
MM
4 years ago
Yes that's right we only supply roses on Dr Huey and as own root and I think both wold be successful. all the roses we supplied to the Ringling have been on Dr Huey and there is somebody who grows a lot of Austins on Huey and is always very happy with them. I think on Fortuniana they can get very big. I think own root would be good too, Angel Gardens In Alachua grow all own root and she could advise on whether they would be good in your climate and on your soil. As long as you got them in quickly you should be fine. If it is v warm you can protect the stems by piling up some mulch until the roots have got established and the new shoots are growing away nicely I hope this helps Michael

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