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Mystery new arrival

G

Mystery new arrival

by 3 years ago
13

Please can someone identify the plant top left of this photo.  Thank you. 

G
3 years ago
(Not the fern, the one just below!)
EB
3 years ago
I'd say it looks like angelica gigas. But let's see if one of our experts can answer
DN
3 years ago
Hi Gayle. I don't think it is Angelica gigas, not grey enough, trouble is there are so many umbellifers with leaves like that. Any more details no flowers?
G
3 years ago
Up to date pictures of plant. I'm thinking relative of cow parsley/hogweed but not seen such lime colouration before. Thanks so much for your help.
AN
3 years ago
The flower heads look like fennel, but leaf pattern is not! ... odd one - good luck in identifying it. Peucedanum verticillare perhaps??
PO
3 years ago
ah could be, they grow for a couple years before flowering
LL
3 years ago
Is it a Lavas plant (herb) or am I saying funny things now? How does the leave smell?
JS
3 years ago
I am sure its wild Celery Apium graveolens
EM
3 years ago
I know it as a wild flower called alexanders.. It's very similar to celery with ribbed stems ,and parsley type leaves and a long tap root. It was brought to the UK by the romans. It is edible but I haven't tried it. It grows everywhere here on Portland and is very attractive when it flowers in early spring. It seeds easily and I have it in my garden... Hmmmm
IC
3 years ago
Agree with Eileen that it looks like alexanders/wild celery. It can become a bit invasive but on the plus side, a chef who visited a local nature reserve I'm involved with, where it is over abundant, was very interested in it for his restaurant. I like the seeds to chew...
EM
3 years ago
I try not to let it go to seed... But I might let one flower seed and try it!
DN
3 years ago
No sure about Alexanders, leaf edges not rounded enough, Alexanders though quite likely especialy given coastal location. An attractive early garden plant, as the colour is a perfect foil for bright pinks such as red campion . Never tried eating, as not too keen on aniseedy flavour, tho’ forage many other things. BUT since I am not sure this is it, don't even think about eating til positive ID made. Many umbellifers (Apiaceae) are toxic, often highly so.
LK
3 years ago
They all rather look like Hogsweed and Horse Parsley to me but then I'm in Design not Gardening :-) I have put together a bit of a compare and contrast of some of the Communities suggestions.

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