Join us and get 10% OFF your first course

Community | Roses
Ask a question

rose planting depth

KD

rose planting depth

by 4 years ago
6

This question is going to expose my stupidity but I have to ask it in light of what I only recently learned: If I have roses planted in my garden in zone 6 (Massachusetts USA) where the bud union/graft is not placed 4" beneath the soil line, should I attempt to replant them accordingly now? Some of the roses have survived as such for 3 years. I have been planting roses to the same soil level in the pots they have come in. In the fall I mound soil and compost heavily around the base and then wrap in landscape fabric.   


PB
4 years ago
I don't have winter to protect the bud union. But In general, I don't like to bury them to deep as it's diffidult to identify if a new brand is from the bud union or from the root stock. I'd just leave it right on the surface so I can identify sucker easily
MM
4 years ago
In zone 6 it depends on which variety you have. Some will be perfectly happy with the bud union at or above ground others may well be killed by the frost. if they've survived 3 years then the chances are they should be fine although they might suffer from wind rock. Apart from protection from frost that is the other advantage of planting deeply - that they will be more secure in the ground but again that depends on the variety especially on how tall it is and where it is planted - whether it is exposed to the wind or not. if you did plant more deeply then winter protection may not be necessary and October would be a good time if you did want to replant it, roses transplant remarkably well
KD
4 years ago
Thank you, Phuong. I'm curious, what zone are you in and do you bury them at all? And again, thank you, Michael, honored; I have so much to learn! (I would really love to see you run a course focused on the essential how-tos of planting and caring for roses in colder regions, ideally tailored to New England.) Where might I find some general guidance on types and planting depths? Also, I have an unrelated question. What sets your roses, David Austins apart and above the others? I am the proud owner of one very beautiful shrub rose whose roses are simply gorgeous but if someone asked me about the difference between your and Weeks for example I couldn't answer. I do know yours cost more! ;-)
MM
4 years ago
The general advice in hot and warm climates is to not bury the bud union as it is reckoned to encourage rotting of the stems although I am never convinced of that argument at all. We'll see what we can do in terms of doing a course focused on planting and caring. there are a couple of books you could consider. Roses for New England by Mike and Angela Chute (who live in New England) and the 2nd Right Rose Right Place by Peter Schneider (who lives near Cleveland) . the difference between an Austin Rose and the other shrub roses - well it's probably easier to see it rather than say it. the first thing is Austins are very variable with flowers that have anything from 5 to 200 petals and they can be short, tall or grown as climbers. they are inspired by the Antique Roses and so generally have a more shrubby informal appearance than the average Hybrid Tea from Weeks which are generally much more upright and formal and have the classic HT type flower. The classic Austin flower is v double often with over 100 petals with the petals beautifully arranged usually in a rosette. the other character is of course fragrance, the Austins generally have a strong and delicious fragrance whereas this is quite often lacking in the average HT or Floribunda. I hope this helps
KD
4 years ago
Very helpful I will look for those books! Your description of Austins matches my limited knowledge of them. The one I have is everything you describe.
PB
4 years ago
Hi Karen, I'm not in the States. I'm in South East Asia - Viet Nam and we have really different climate. We're sub-troipical and South Viet Nam is exactly what Micheal said, hot and very humid. Fungus is generally a bigger issue. And pest is more out of control since they can breed easily.

Register to answer this question

or if you already have an account, click here to log in

Proud to work with...