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growing climbing roses in zone 6 (Massachusetts, USA)

KD

growing climbing roses in zone 6 (Massachusetts, USA)

by 4 years ago
12
I dream of sitting under a rose covered arbor (preferably one covered by my 2 gorgeous candy land climbers http://www.heirloomroses.com/candy-land.html) but each year (I've had the plants for 3 years) they only make it up the side of my arbor about 5 ft and come spring each plant starts growing back from the base rather than from the 5 foot canes (which are now dead). I stop feeding in August, in winter I mound soil and mulch to protect the base and last year I wrapped the canes in burlap to protect against wind. Right? Wrong? Perhaps I did not plant them correctly? Or is that the variety is not suitable for zone 6?            
EB
4 years ago
Hi Karen - Btw if you want guaranteed access to Michael for four weeks, and a more structured learning approach - I'd suggest Michael's roses course where you can ask as many questions as you like. In the meantime I'm sure he'll pop by in a while. Good to hear from you again! Perhaps you can post us some more photos of your roses as the grow
EB
4 years ago
Here's Michael's course
taught by
Michael Marriott
Book Now

Roses

How to plan and nurture a beautiful rose garden

KD
4 years ago
Hi Elspeth, I saw the course but only one of the classes was of real interest to me. Is it possible to sign up for one class only?
EB
4 years ago
Not at the moment- but it's something we can think about. Which class was it?
AM
4 years ago
Hi Karen - I've taken a look at the site but can't see which variety of rose you have? Can you clarify? If you want an arbor to be covered you really want quite a strong growing climber or rambler with a lax, more trailing habit; nothing too upright. I suspect you are growing a climbing form of a bush rose and its just not vigorous enough.
KD
4 years ago
Hi Elspeth, it's the one more technical in nature: growing and care.
KD
4 years ago
KD
4 years ago
Hi again Andy, I had created another post about my climber where I shared info about it and what I've been doing to care for it. According to the label it is: a Modern Climber Height: 10-12 ft. (3-3.6 m) 12-15 ft. (3.6-4.7 m) not sure why there are 2 diff heights?
KD
4 years ago
Actually, I just saw that we are within that post, Andy. (the way comments stack I wasn't sure.) There is a link above that should take you to another website with info about the rose.
MM
4 years ago
Hello Karen, sorry about the delay in replying - a very busy weekend in our garden! Looking up Candy Land on HelpMeFind I se it is meant to be quite a vigorous climber although of course it depends what climate you are in. On the website it says hardy to 5B so 6 should be OK but of course winters vary hugely and climbers are more susceptible to winter cold than shrubs. Sounds as though you did the right thing mounding soil and wrapping in burlap so that is disappointing. When wrapping it is important to delay doing it until the winter is well established otherwise the wrapping might encourage soft new growth which will be more susceptible to the cold. Again in spring don't be tempted to take the wrapping off too early. I know in upstate NY this year the winter was quite mild but then got some very nasty cold weather in spring after some warm weather which was disastrous. it is important not to feed them too late and not to dead head later in the season so that they are not encouraged to produce new young growth There will be climbers that are probably more hardy than Candy Land - Crown Princess Margareta and James Galway are two that immediately come to mind Michael
KD
4 years ago
Thank you Michael! I think I did wrap too soon. I will also look for the varieties that you mentioned and give one a try. Might my lack of pruning skills or fertilizing/feeding routine be limiting upward growth?
MM
4 years ago
Your pruning and fertilising might well effect the growth although if they are growing to 5ft in one season that is not too bad. But by treating them differently you might well make them more resistant to the cold. If they get cut right down there is not much you do wring in terms of pruning.

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