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Pruning Rambling Roses

ML

Pruning Rambling Roses

by 4 years ago
7

Hello Gardschool, two of my roses (planted two years ago) are putting out long, thick runners.  Would your advice be to train these runners along the top of fence, or prune hard back?

The advice given on the RHS site doesn't make this clear.

The runners are almost touching the lawn - appro 8 to 12ft long tendrils.


EB
4 years ago
Hi Marilyn - interesting question! We'll see who's about to answer over the next few days
EB
4 years ago
Michael Marriott (David Austin Roses) sometimes comes over the wall from the classrooms here..
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AM
4 years ago
Hi Marilyn Certainly train them in - they will flower next year. Many people make the mistake of cutting these vigorous shoots back on rambler roses. These plants naturally throw up these strong shoots with the intention of scrambling their way up a support to produce flowers next season. Cut them off and you will have a miserable display. The growth to prune back is the growth that flowered this year. Wear gloves! Andy
MM
4 years ago
It sounds as though your rose might be a bit over vigorous for that position. it is a common mistake wanting the rose to cover the area quickly without thinking of the final height it grows to. Gardeners are an impatient bunch! Which variety is it? If there is a handy tree close by? perhaps point it in that direction for it to grow through. Andy is absolutely right you should train in the new young growth as those will be the shoots that will flower next year. The shorter side shoots that flowered this year (usually about 30-50cm long and growing from the main shoot) should be reduced in winter down to about 10cm and these should re-shoot next year and flower again
EB
4 years ago
MM
4 years ago
here is a photograph of a pruned climber that might help. Climbers and ramblers are pruned in the same way if you need to keep them in check and train them to cover something. That's the advantage of growing ramblers into trees - you cant access them to prune and they do fine without any intervention
EB
4 years ago
Thanks Michael - great pic for explaining

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